Fredy Miranda Hernandez

In celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15), Cox is casting a spotlight on some of the employees who make up our rich and diverse company culture.  

The Latinx community is made up of people from many ethnic groups with diverse histories, languages, countries of origin, and cultures. In this Q&A, Fredy Miranda Hernandez shares his experience as a Latino at Cox and the principles – instilled in him by his mother – that guide every facet of his life. Fredy-Miranda-Hernandez-square-(1).png
 

How has your culture and upbringing influenced how you have lived your life?  How has it also influenced how you show up every day for work?

I come from a family of immigrants. My mother immigrated to the U.S. with no family, no money and not knowing the language. She had to adapt to life in the U.S, but she ensured that my siblings and I inherited our Latino culture. My mother taught us how to prioritize the way we live our daily lives: Fe, Familia y Ech├índole Ganas (Faith, Family and Working Hard).   

She worked double shifts, weekends and holidays without ever complaining. She explained that the great equalizer in life was to work harder than everyone else. Everything I’ve learned through my upbringing and cultural inheritance from my mother has helped me in my career here at Cox. After my first day of orientation, I made a commitment to myself that I was going to be the best I could possibly be at my role. The following year, I was the recipient of the Winner Circle Award.

My upbringing, the way I grew up, helped me be grateful for what I have. There is nothing that I take for granted – every day I show to work with this same mindset that I must earn the right to be here. 


How does your Hispanic / Latinx heritage play into your traditions, beliefs and lifestyle? How do you keep those traditions alive?

As I started my own family, it was important for me to keep the culture I love so much alive and teach it to my daughter. My 3-year-old speaks fluent Spanish so that she can stay close with her grandparents, who don’t speak much English.  Eating together strengthens our family bond and my daughter looks forward to making fresh handmade tortillas with grandma. These traditions will continue with my daughter and future generations. 


What do you think is important for others at the company to know about your experience being Hispanic or Latinx in corporate America and at Cox?

First, everyone should realize that Cox is such a diverse and inclusive company. They value the concept of hard work. Cox took a chance on me, invested in me, challenged me as a Store Manager and propelled my career as a Market Manager. What upsets me, and most of the Latino community, is how most companies depict our roles and contributions to their employers. They stereotype our work as primarily manual labor. Very few companies show the growth and contribution that Latinos can make in corporate America. Cox is the exception. We are so diverse from the frontline to senior leadership. It gives Latinos hope and something to strive for when we see executives and senior leadership with last names like Herrera and Castillo. 


What do you think is the greatest need to move the Hispanic / Latinx community forward – and how can others help?

I believe the greatest need for Latino Community is to operate without fear. The fear that all too often exists because of legal status. Too often, we stay quiet about important issues in our community like education reform. Hispanics have the highest high school drop-out rates in the country and there aren’t enough grass root efforts to address this concern. We need to have a bigger voice for our children’s education.

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